Business Development in Emerging Markets: The Impact on spending behaviour of elderly caregivers of family members with HIV/AIDS in SA

Christo Boshoff, Bruce E Klemz, Noxolo-Eileen Mazibuko

Abstract


Business development in emerging markets, known as the “base of the pyramid”, is not without financial risk and a key concern in South African communities are the costs associated with HIV/AIDS. Due to the enormous demand for healthcare, many governments have opted for home-based care systems. Caregivers are mainly older women and their financial survival is critically important. We found that as the patient’s illness progressed: 1) the cultural norm ubuntu led the caregiver to increase spending on the patient and a decreased spending on themselves and 2) the social pressure of stigma led to a very dramatic drop in direct interpersonal assistance to the patient and an increase in spending on themselves. Their resulting coping strategies and implications for economic development are discussed.

Keywords - Emerging Markets, Cultural, Health Services


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/sajems.v13i4.55

Submitted: 29 July 2010
Published: 01 December 2010


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South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences    |    ISSN: 1015-8812 (PRINT)    |    ISSN: 2222-3436 (ONLINE)